Monday, 5 April 2010

Climates (Iklimler) [2006]


Climates, directed by Nuri Bilge Ceylan, darling of the festival circuit and maker of the brilliant Uzak, is another stark and austere drama on man’s inherent need and failure to connect. Set in an increasingly detached and distant Turkish diaspora, Climates is about the breakdown of a seemingly happy relationship where the resultant turbulence felt by the concerned couple is more inward than outward. A university professor and his much younger girlfriend who works for a TV channel (played, in a brave casting decision, by the director and his real-life wife) who, while on a vacation after a long time, realize that they have drifted too apart emotionally to remain happy together. However, despite rekindling a raw physical affair with an old flame, the laconic guy realizes that he is now lonelier than ever before, and thus makes one last attempt to bridge the huge chasm that has developed between him and his former fiancé. The narrative is slow, and long moments of silence rather than words define most of the proceedings – thus making this a difficult watch for most. Contrarily, if one is willing to put in some effort and allow the movie to reveal its various layers and subtleties, he will not regret watching this intense and beautifully photographed human drama.








Director: Nuri Bilge Ceylan
Genre: Drama/Psychological Drama
Language: Turkish
Country: Turkey

5 comments:

Miss Topanga said...

ooh, this sounds very good. hope i can get my hands on it.

Tom said...

yeah I want to see this one too.

Shubhajit said...

@Miss Topanga & Tom:

Yeah, please do, and I'll be looking forward to reading your views on it. And if you can manage, do also watch this director's Uzak.

Sam Juliano said...

"A stark and austere drama on man’s inherent need and failure to connect."

Aye Shubhajit, and your splendid capsule does this distinguished work full justice.

"The narrative is slow, and long moments of silence rather than words define most of the proceedings – thus making this a difficult watch for most."

This is true, but wouldn't you say that the great French director Claire Denis also falls under these specifications, in a very good sense of course?

Shubhajit said...

Thanks a lot Sam for the good words. Yeah, a good work of art need not be easily accessible for the viewers as the artist does not necessarily have to please his/her audience. Well, Claire Denis is one of many acclaimed director who I haven't explored a lot, need to correct that blemish.