Monday, 9 March 2009

The Curious Case of Benjamin Button [2008]


The Curious Case of Benjamin Button is proof enough that David Fincher and Brad Pitt make an excellent hunting pair. But, like me, if you were expecting a gritty and disturbing piece like their previous collaborations, Seven and Fight Club, you’ll be left a tad disappointed. That, of course, is in no way an opinion about the movie per se – the visually sweeping love story of a man who ages in reverse, does attain epic and heart-warming proportions. At best, the movie is captivating with its unique subject matter and stunning special effects, but at worst, it does at times take the form of an effusively sentimental melodrama. What saves the movie from going overboard and ensures that it is watchable, is that despite never even being close to Fincher’s best work, its heart does appear to be at the right place. Moreover, the acting is first rate. Brad Pitt is especially note-worthy for his nuanced and moving portrayal of a man at odds with fellow members of his species. Hence, in short, Benjamin Button’s Forest Gump-like journey through contemporary American history is captivating in parts thanks to its technical virtuosity, but doesn’t really have the bite or brilliance to leave the kind of lasting impression that some of Fincher's earlier works have.








Director: David Fincher
Genre: Drama/Romantic Drama/Epic/Fantasy
Language: English
Country: US

6 comments:

Little Girl Lost said...

u beat me to it again... kintu amar tao poro...
chobi ta amari.
:)

theseventhart.info said...

Oh yes... I thought it was waste of a great story (I don't mean Roth's script). Just goes to show why Tim Burton is as good as he is. I feel disappointed whenever I think how the film would have turned out if he had directed it...

Shubhajit said...

You're right, the story could have easily been translated into a more taut movie. As for Tim Burton being better suited to direct the movie, why do you say that?

theseventhart.info said...

Ok, Take Edward Scissorhads (hope you have seen it) or any other of his films (oh ya, sleepy hollow too).

It was quite easy to make it a "deeply moving" film portraying the tribulations of Ed. How he is unable to find friends and love. How his condition is so darn moving etc. BTW< give it to Eric Roth, he would do something like this:


Ed escapes the mansion.... goes to a brothel... sadly returns...joins the war.... somehow survives amidst massacre.... comes back to become a fencing champion, but still is searching for the sweetheart he saww in his child hood. And after about 120 minutes, Ed is as "pathetic" as he was and the audience is in great tears...
It is a template we all know....


See what Burton has created. Edward scissorhands is not is brother that he should treat him sympathetically. He is his creation and what a glorious imagination it is.... man with a pair of scissors on his fists....


He goes in for total comedy... the hair cut, the neighbourhood, the whole tone of the film is such that it never takes the film as seriously as Fincher has. Burton never fails us to move too... But he never forces that. That I feel is a strength that TCCOBB clearly lacks...


Do check 0out Burton's film if you haven't. Its worth it... All of them are...

Shubhajit said...

I have seen a few movies of Tim Burton, like Batman, Sleepy Hollow and Planet of the Apes. As for Edward Scissorhands, I've seen it only in bits and pieces. I guess I need to watch his Ed Wood too.

sitenoise said...

I'm not sure I completely understand theseventhart.info's comment but, strangely, agree with it anyway.